Question – What would be the best and worst parts of immortality?

Now I know what you’re thinking, the title of this post seems rather odd given the content I usually create for this blog.  I stumbled on an article on OMGfacts (yes I actually waste my time there). It was about a marvel hero whose only power was being immortal, and he never made it into the public spot, in fact he was part of a less talented group of Avengers.  His name was  “Mr. Immortal“.

Mister Immortal
Mister Immortal (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

As I read through the article on OMG facts it got me thinking.   Immortality would be an amazing power to have.  Just think about it, you can see the future become history and see what the future brings without having to worry about death.

Though I also got to thinking, if Immortality was so good then why do many cultures and media consider it to be a curse?  It turns out it can be.

You see while being immortal may seem like the best thing, watching loved ones die while you can’t, can lead to depression.  Seeing everyone die around you is horrible, because you’re not able to join them.

In fact “Fortune” from Metal Gear Solid 2 is a very good example of the price that comes with Immortality.  Within 6 months Fortune lost her whole family, and even her unborn child, bullets would veer away from here in battle, grenades wouldn’t explode near her and missiles would just bounce off her.  Although this “Immortality” was created by a small device, she eventually managed to summon her powers naturally and protected Snake, Raiden and Solidus from Liquid’s MG Rex onslaught before she died from being shot by Ocelot. While she died she said “Finally I can see my family again”.

However Vamp from MGS2 and MGS4, was immortal but he didn’t suffer from losing family, and in fact he loved it.  His “immortality” was in fact caused by Nano machines that rapidly sped up the healing process.  He survived not one but two gun shots to the head.  He eventually died when Naomi injected him with nano machine suppressants.

Another “Immortal” MGS character was Raiden.  In Metal Gear Solid 4 his entire body was made from a cybernetic exosekelton, and only his head was the real human part.  He was able to survive losing large amounts of white blood and his arm, which he chopped off himself. He was still able to fight off a group of enemies, and was also able to summon lightening strikes in a small corridor.  Although this came at the price of  heavy depression, thanks to the events of Metal Gear Solid 2 and as such had no regard for his own life, he believed he had nothing else to lose.  He was wrong, he had his girlfriend Rose and his son.

Metal Gear Solid 2: Sons of Liberty Original S...
Metal Gear Solid 2: Sons of Liberty Original Soundtrack cover (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

To me, being immortal would be great. I could walk around Wythenshawe without fearing for my life.  I could actually take risks, and I wouldn’t have to worry about dying.

On the flip side, what happens when the world ends? There’ll be no human left alive apart from myself.

Not being able to join them would send me into a depression and I would be walking around what’s left of earth for all eternity with nothing to do.  I could even see the next stage of evolution take place.

However if immortality was something I could switch on and off when I wanted then that wouldn’t be so bad. I could switch it on when I needed it say for example in a fight or when I am taking huge risks.

What do you think would be good and bad about immortality, would you trade it for dying with loved ones?  Let me know in the comments.

Thanks for reading.

 

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